The hottest new hydrogel developed in Australia me

2022-08-09
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Australia has developed a new type of hydrogel to meet the needs of "4D printing"

release date: Source: friction will occur between the working piston and the working cylinder: Bisheng editor: Chinese packaging Views: 701 copyright and disclaimer

core tip: researchers at Wollongong University in Australia have developed a hydrogel compatible with 3D printers. This hydrogel material is strong, And it can constantly change its shape according to the water temperature. These scientists demonstrated this technology by 3D printing an automatic water valve. In addition, this material can also be used to make soft robots, custom design sensors, and self assemble macro structures

[China Packaging News] researchers at the University of Wollongong in Australia have developed a hydrogel compatible with 3D printers. This hydrogel material is strong and can constantly change its shape according to the water temperature. These scientists demonstrated this technology by 3D printing an automatic water valve. In addition, this material can also be used to make soft robots, custom design sensors, and self assemble macro structures

the purpose of the so-called 4D printing is to expand additive manufacturing to the dimension of time. The idea is to make 3D printed objects by using special materials that do not have much modification effect on heat and water or are pressure sensitive. Even if these objects have been out of the printer for a long time, they can automatically change their shape in a very specific and purposeful way according to the environmental conditions. In some cases, some objects can even return to their original shape

Examples of

4d printing include items that can be easily self-assembled when baking, polymers that can be bent according to water, heat or pressure, and smart ropes inspired by self-assembled nanostructures. However, it is undeniable that the current stage of 4D printing is far from the practical stage, but this technology is very young, and it is likely to make significant progress, just like 3D printing

according to het panhuis and Professor MARC in the team, the current 4D printing application can make dramatic changes in the shape of objects, but usually requires a long reaction time. It is a new impact testing machine that can instantly measure and record the characteristic curve of materials in the process of impact. As these materials bend, they will lose mechanical strength. In addition, as long as they reach a certain point, the shape change will be reversible. Therefore, scientists have developed a special hydrogel, which can produce rapid, reversible and mechanically reliable changes according to the change of water temperature

researchers created a material using hard ion covalent entanglement (ice) gel as the active substance, with a concentration of 20%. Ice gel contains two polymer complexes that rely on cross-linking ions and covalent chemical bonds. This unique structure makes the material harder, and can prevent micro cracks in the structure and avoid catastrophic mechanical failure

if the critical temperature exceeds 35C (95F), the gel will quickly lose most of its water content. HP engineers can test the color and voxel level, and control it to about 50%. Panhuis and his colleagues regard this phenomenon as a valve for 3D printing. When encountering hot water, it will close and lock 99% of the water. When the water temperature drops, it will open. Unlike standard 3D printing materials, this gel variant can be switched on and off repeatedly without human intervention

although this technology is still in its infancy, deformable materials like this (whether deformed in the presence of water, heat or pressure) may lead to great progress in architecture. In some extreme environments, such as outer space, it is easy to assemble materials without relying on humans or expensive refined robots. In addition, if 3D printing in the future evolves to the molecular level, then medical applications may be truly innovative

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